Death of Common Sense, Part 73867: 16 Year-Old Honor Student Charged with 2 Felonies for Committing Unauthorized Science

Seriously? Yes, at least according to Business Insider:

Kiera Wilmot was a typical 16-year-old honor student at Bartow Senior High School, in Bartow, Florida. She’s never been in trouble. She has a reputation for being nice to everyone, getting straight As, and loving science.
But then a science experiment Wilmot conducted on school grounds went slightly wrong.
At 7 a.m. on Monday April 30, Wilmot and a yet-to-be-named friend mixed aluminum foil and toilet bowl cleaner in a small water bottle. After about 30 seconds, the reaction created pressure inside the bottle, blowing the cap off with a pop that according to witnesses sounded like firecrackers going off.
(Instructions to make this explosion, called a “works bomb,” are freely available online. The aluminum in the foil reacts with sodium hydroxide in the cleaner. The reaction produces hydrogen gas, which quickly builds the pressure inside the closed bottle until the plastic can’t take it any more and explodes outwards.)
The reaction created a small amount of smoke. Her friend walked away, and the Assistant Principal Dan Durham walked over.
No one was hurt by the “explosion,” but later that day Wilmot was handcuffed, arrested, and expelled from school. According to the police report, she has been charged with two felonies: “possession/discharge of a weapon on school grounds” and “discharging a destructive device.”

If this story as reported is true, it is yet another example of how our society has turned into a bizarro world, where people who have spent so many years steeped in political correctness that every molecule of common sense has been drained from their besotted brains. Allegedly responsible adults think that 15 year-olds should be able to engage in unprotected sex, knowing that they can purchase morning-after pills with no one being the wiser, but intellectually, curious honor students are hauled off in handcuffs for doing unauthorized chemistry experiments. Something is very wrong.

I’m not suggesting Asst. Principal Durham approves of the supplying of morning-after pills to minors, and I also realize that perhaps we don’t have the whole story.

That’s why I have contacted Asst. Principal Durham to ask for some clarification on this case. Specifically, I asked him:

(1) Other media are reporting that you approached Ms. Wilmot on April 30 and that later that day she was handcuffed, arrested and expelled from school. Is that true? If so, were you the one who made the decision to contact the police? If not, who did?
(2) Given the fact that no one was injured, why was this “incident,” actually a instance of students committing science without teacher supervision, considered a police matter? Is it customary for your school to involve police in enforcing school policy?
(3) Is it true that Ms. Wilmot is an honor student? Has she had any previous disciplinary incidents at school?
(4) Were Ms. Wilmot’s parents informed before she encountered the police?

I’ll let you know what he tells me in response to these questions.

 

 

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