O’Reilly Interviewing the President or his BFF?

Now that I’ve had a chance to digest last Sunday’s Super Bowl, I can, as promised, share more about Bill O’Reilly’s pre-Super Bowl interview with Barack Obama. As you know, I watch so you don’t have to. Given the participants, no one should be surprised that it was a complete waste of time, in which these two egomaniacs licked each other like a couple of newborn puppies from the same litter. The biggest mystery was how they managed to fit both of their egos in the same room at the same time. Barack Hussein Obama aka Sham WOW (Walks on Water) is legendary for his thin-skinned narcissism and his propensity for masquerading as a practical centrist. Bill O’Reilly likes to portray himself as above the partisan and ideological fray, a purely objective truth-seeking journalist, a crusader operating in the interest of “the folks.” I suppose he’d have chosen the phrase “the little people,” but that was taken by the late Leona Helmsley. Both Obama and O’Reilly are correct. They are not partisan or ideological. They reserve their loyalty for the most important thing on earth, not some stupid core belief or principle; that is, Himself.

If there is anyone left who still takes O’Reilly’s objective reporter act seriously, this interview should have been enough to enlighten even the most distracted viewers that it is just that. Any shred of journalistic credibility that Bill had is gone, flushed down the dumper once and for all by his willingness to allow Obama to repeat easily disprovable, risible and incessantly repeated lies, such as:

“if you like your doctor, you can keep your doctor.”
“I never raised anyone’s taxes.”

In his defense for this kiss fest, O’Reilly attempts to convince us that it would have been disrespectful or, dare I say, uncivil to ask a public official a respectful question about public policy. Does he really expect us to believe that it would have been wrong to respond to Obama’s bald-faced lie about his health care scheme by saying something like:

“OK, Mr. President. You say that your health plan’s implementation won’t result in any American having the doctor that he likes no longer there for him. However, just last month Richard Foster, Medicare’s chief actuary disagrees. He testified before the House Budget Committee last month that the claim that people would keep their current coverage was “not true in all cases.” So, Mr. President, who is correct? And if it’s Mr. Foster, and I happen to be one of those cases that loses his current doctor, what do you say to me?”

I can certainly see Fox News’ Chris Wallace asking that question, and several others that are equally challenging. If the public official were a Republican, such as say, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor(R-VA), I can see David Gregory conducting a Soviet show trial style interrogation. I actually can see it. So can you. Just go online and watch what happened whenI when Mr. Cantor appeared on Meet the Press last January 23. Instead of asking serious questions, Bill asked Barry whether it disturbs him that so many people hate him. Really? Was he interviewing the President of the United States or is he trying to comfort his BFF after the mean girls teased him?

How hard would it have been to have one of the several dozen associate producers/staffers/go-fers to rustle up this list of the two dozen tax increases that Obama has happily signed? How rude and uncivil would it have been to mention that at this very minute the Obama Justice Department is defending his health care racket’s breathtaking federal government overreach by claiming that its individual mandate to buy health insurance is a “tax?”

Our culture’s descent into red carpet-obsessed stupidity is partly to blame for the election of the dangerously inexperienced, arrogant, pompous empty suit Celebutard-in-Chief. The sideshow is now the whole show. Fortunately serious people who actually care about the future of our country don’t have to rely on cartoonish clowns masquerading as journalists to report what is really going on.

The Teri O'Brien Show

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