Who Does Andrea Mitchell Think She’s Fooling?

Last week, Andrea Mitchell decided to do her part in the LSM’s re-elect Barack Obama mission by distracting us from the rampant lawlessness, corruption and economic failures of the current administration. The current initiative’s objective is get Americans to focus on the number one burning issue keeping Americans awake at night. Not the threat posed by an imminently nuclear Iran. Not the millions so discouraged by the Obama economy that they have dropped out of the labor force. Not the numbers of good doctors leaving the practice of medicine due to the crushing regulations that are only the first wave of the Regime’s takeover of the health care system. Of course, those relative trivialities pale in comparison to what is obviously the most important issue in the upcoming presidential election, unfettered access to unlimited birth control.

So, Andrea invited Rick Santorum supporter and campaign contributor Foster Friess on her low-rated MS-NBC show to implore him to explain Mr. Santorum’s alleged unreasonable, even pre-historic, attitudes toward birth control, and by implication, the role of women in society. Never mind that this supposed Neanderthal Santorum does not believe in banning contraception, and that he in fact did vote for funding it. Here’s part of their exchange:

“I get such a chuckle when these things come out,” he said. He added, “We have jihadist camps being set up in Latin America, which Rick has been warning about and people seem to be so preoccupied with sex — I think it says something about our culture. We maybe need a massive therapy session so we can concentrate on what the real issues are.”

Friess then turned to contraception. “This contraceptive thing, my gosh it’s such [sic] inexpensive. Back in my days, they used Bayer Aspirin for contraception. The gals put it between their knees and it wasn’t that costly,” he said.

Mitchell, taken aback, said, “Excuse me, I’m just trying to catch my breath from that” and changed the subject. Friess later described Santorum as “truly the post-partisan candidate,” a line ascribed to then-candidate Barack Obama in 2008.

I’m a little confused. Is this the same Andrea Mitchell currently appearing in a promo on her network, explaining her start in journalism, battling to be taken seriously at a time when “people didn’t think a woman could be a reporter?” And this throwaway joke makes her get a case of the vapors? Perhaps they need to put a fainting couch in her studio. This statement reflects the same confused and illogical feminist mentality that says that only evil, invidious discrimination prevents from women by being on the front lines in combat, while at the same time claims that the very same women need a federal agency to protect them from off-color jokes in the workplace. In her promo, Andrea recounts facing down a dictator’s security force during a trip to the Sudan with Condi Rice, but apparently that was nothing compared to this horrifying aspirin joke! PULEEZE.

Clearly, Andrea’s claim that Mr. Friess’ statement took her breath away is ridiculous, but not only because she’s a tough, experienced journalist. I don’t mean to be cruel, but does Ms. Mitchell, born in 1946, really expect us to believe that she never heard anything like Mr. Friess’ joke? Andrea, I’m sorry, but you are more than old enough to remember the clear distinction between “nice girls,” who definitely did keep their knees together, with or without the assistance of an aspirin, and the “easy” girls who didn’t. Back in the day, in say 1962 or so, when young Andrea and her friends were going to the prom (and yes, I know I’m being generous in assuming that she actually had a prom date), everyone understood what people meant when a girl lost her “reputation” and earned the title “tramp.” Remember this movie? It was extremely popular when Ms. Mitchell was in her early teens, and accurately reflects our society’s attitudes about sex and morality then.

I am much younger–I assure you, much much younger–than Andrea, and I remember the whispers when a girl in my high school “got in trouble” and was actually sent away to live with a relative in another state to have her baby.

If Medicare-eligible Ms. Mitchell really doesn’t remember what it was like back in the day, she could ask her 200-year old husband.

The Teri O'Brien Show

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