Always Wrong, But Never in Doubt: Typical Media Dolt/Affirmative Action Hire Eugene Robinson Ferrets Out More Obvious (and Non-Existent) Racism

EugeneRobinson

You can see the WaPo’s Eugene Robinson, an unabashed Obama apologist, on the 24/7 televised nuthouse all the time, running his mouth to the delight of his fellow liberals like Chris “The Screamer” Matthews. He is a baby boomer who had the good fortune of starting his career during the 1970’s wave of white guilt that spawned affirmative action programs in academia and journalism. He is also the walking embodiment of the truth of Abraham Lincoln’s admonition “Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt.” In yesterday’s column, he demonstrates that, as usual, he doesn’t know what he’s talking about. He writes:

When Sen. Jay Rockefeller (D-W.Va.) remarked last week that some of the opposition to President Obama’s Affordable Care Act is “maybe he’s of the wrong color,” he was just saying out loud what many people believe. And no, he wasn’t calling Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) a “racist.”

Believing that some of the Republican and tea party opposition to Obama has to do with his race is not, I repeat not, the same as saying that anyone who disagrees with the nation’s first black president is racist. …

But Rockefeller didn’t call him a racist. Nor did he “play the race card,” as Johnson accused him of doing.

My purpose here is not to convince everyone that Rockefeller is right about the massive GOP resistance to Obama — although I certainly agree with him — but rather to consider the things we say when we want to avoid talking about race. “You called me a racist” and “You played the race card” have become all-purpose conversation stoppers.

Actually, Gene, the all-purpose conversation stopper, and by design, is the mentioning of Obama’s race any time anyone disagrees with one of his moronic, socialist policies. That assertion designed to chill any analysis of Obama’s “remaking” of America. It’s right out of the Alinsky playbook, and it’s REALLY getting old.

By the way, when Sen. Rockefeller says that maybe some view the One as maybe “the wrong color,” why is that assumed to be black? Isn’t he also white? I’m confused.

OK, so after assuring his readers that he bends over backwards to avoid accusing anyone from being a racist, he writes:

I’m reminded of a tea party rally at the Capitol four years ago when Congress was about to pass the Affordable Care Act. I can’t say that the demonstrators who hissed and spat at members of the Congressional Black Caucus were racists — but I saw them committing racist acts. I can’t say that the people holding “Take Back Our Country” signs were racists — but I know this rallying cry arose after the first African American family moved into the White House.

Surprisingly, given that this is Eugene Robinson we’re talking about, this statement is breathtakingly inaccurate, as Byron York points out here. He writes:

Some examples. In the 2004 race, Democratic nominee John Kerry sometimes asked supporters to help him “take back our country.” “It’s time to take back our country,” Kerry declared at a rally in Manchester, N.H. in late October. When Kerry called John Edwards to invite him onto the Democratic ticket, aides revealed that Kerry’s words to Edwards were, “John, Teresa and I would like to ask you and Elizabeth to join us on our ticket to take back our country.”

Early Democratic frontrunner Howard Dean used the phrase “take back our country” too many times to count. In fact, Dean wrote a campaign book titled “You Have the Power: How to Take Back Our Country and Restore Democracy in America.”

Former Vice President Al Gore said it, too. “We need to take back our country,” Gore declared in endorsing Dean in January 2004.

At a Democratic fundraiser in December 2003, Hillary Clinton pledged to work “on behalf of a campaign to take back our country.” After the election, in 2005, Clinton declared, “We are ready to go forth and fight to take back our country.”

From the podium of the Democratic National Convention in July 2004, Rep. Louise Slaughter declared, “We will take back our country.” Also at the convention, Sen. Debbie Stabenow said, “We’re here to take back our country.” And Los Angeles leader Antonio Villaraigosa, chair of the party platform committee, declared, “We Democrats have come to this convention … to take back our country!”

And it didn’t stop with the 2004 campaign. Clinton used “take back our country” countless times in her 2008 presidential race. And when Clinton finally conceded defeat and endorsed Obama, she said, with Obama right next to her, “We are not going to rest until we take back our country.”

Byron York cites even more examples, but I think we’ve demonstrated just how incorrect Mr. Robinson’s beliefs and writing are about the use of this phrase. Democrats used the phrase “take back our country” more often than “Good Morning” during Pres. Bush’s terms in office.

Eugene Robinson, you poor thing. Two pieces of advice: (1) don’t believe everything (or actually anything) you see “reported” on MS-NBC and (2) have someone show you how to use Lexus-Nexus so you can do a search before you make a fool of yourself again.

Now that you know that your lame defense of Sen. Rockefeller’s repulsive remark is based on a mistaken belief, will you correct the record? Does the fact that you couldn’t have been more wrong if your name was Eugene McWrong Wrongington matter to an important “journalist” like you?

I think we all know the answer.

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